The Boston Marathon Run Explosion

Multiple People Injured After Explosions Near Finish Line at Boston Marathon

All living things — including bugs and fish and people — die. It’s difficult, even for grownups, to understand why this must happen. It may be the hardest thing of all to understand. The best we can do is to accept death as a fact of life. It happens, and we can’t do anything to change that. May the soul of all who died rest in peace.

As investigators combed through what Boston’s top police official described as “the most complex crime scene we’ve dealt with in the history of our department,” leaders vowed to emerge unbowed from Monday’s terror attack.

“Moments like this and our response to them define who we are,” Suffolk County District Attorney Dan Conley said, a day after a pair of bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, killing three and injuring 176.

Investigators spent Monday going over the 12-block crime scene and fanning out to interview witnesses, with FBI Boston Field Office Special Agent in Charge Richard Des vowing to go to the “ends of the earth” to find out who was behind the bombing.

He said Tuesday that there was no known imminent threat in the wake of the twin bombings. And Massachusetts Gov. D. Patrick stressed that, despite earlier reports, there were no unexploded bombs discovered after the attack.

Authorities pleaded for the public to submit cell phone images and video that could help unravel the mystery of who created such carnage at one of the nation’s most storied sporting traditions.

The blasts, which killed an 8-year-old boy and two other people, marked a grotesque end to what should have been a celebration of triumph.

One man’s legs were instantly blown off, yet he kept trying to stand up. Exhausted marathoners had to muscle the energy to flee the bloody scene. And some 176 people sought treatment at area hospitals, some of them gravely wounded, Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

Investigators don’t know the motive for the bombings and don’t have a specific suspect, nor have they found any surveillance video showing the bombs being placed, a law enforcement source told CNN on Tuesday.

A day after the bombings, as Pope Francis told Bostonians to “combat evil with good” and runners in Atlanta staged a silent run to commemorate the victims, Americans alternately mourned and nervously wondered who was behind the violence.

Advertisements